How clients find the right recruiter…

A good recruiter/head-hunter can be an invaluable asset to any HR Manager or Hiring Manager. If you have not yet experienced success with a recruiter then perhaps you dealing with their approaches in the wrong way?

Here are 5 tips for a successful business relationship with a recruitment consultant:

  1. Choosing the right recruiter. Don’t just settle for the first one that calls you and promises the world instead, choose a niche recruiter. You need to feel comfortable with his or her approach and not feel at all pressured, pick a consultant who specialises in your sector and check out their profile on the social networks. Most good recruiters will check you out before deciding to call so they already feel you would be a suitable client for them! There are niche recruiters available for every sector e.g. mining, careers in power, technical and senior appointments etc. Use one who is connected with your industry and can recruit for the country where you need staff. You could be an Australian mining company with operations in Asia and Africa or an American owned company needing German speaking staff. You need an international recruiter with an appropriate database, language skills, track record and network of candidates.

  2. Be honest and comprehensive with your answers when asked questions.
    It should go without saying that the most important part of a recruiter client relationship is open and frank communication. If you have specific requirements, tell them straight away and if you have concerns about how they are proposing to recruit for you then say so. For example, you may know that in certain countries where you hire, particular nationalities work well together and others do not so tell your recruiter exactly who you want. Tell them your interview procedure; visa process, normal timescales, rotation, shift pattern, salary range, required skill-sets etc. An experienced recruiter relishes a challenge and prefers to be prepared prior to negotiations with candidates rather than being given new information at offer stage. Whatever you do, do not withhold information and if you do not know the answer then get it as soon as you can!

  3. Request and reward.
    Offer your recruiter exclusivity and do not try and negotiate the fee to rock bottom as it will have a negative effect. Recruiters are human, have bills to pay and choose their clients carefully. If you want a mediocre service then refusing to pay more than 50% of the recruiter’s suggested fee may get you exactly that or a straight refusal. Often recruiters will ask how many others are engaged, good consultants will not be interested in working with clients who use multiple recruiters because the only thing they are doing is complicating matters. You will be able to get the attention of a seasoned, effective recruiter by responding promptly to their calls, emails and requests for feedback. Loyalty ensues and you will be able to cultivate a bond with a recruiter who knows you are counting on them to fill that important vacancy!

  4. Listen and inform.
    Engaging the help of a recruiter will help you fill existing vacancies and those that come up in the future. Once a recruiter learns about your particular needs they will always be on the lookout for candidates you may want to hire. They read hundreds of CVs, register candidates daily, expand their candidate pool through social networks, offer referral fees to senior candidates and work hard attracting passive job seekers. Respond to your recruiter’s enquiries well then the CV’s will arrive in your inbox and the quality of the candidates will be excellent.

Investing the time talking to a “compatible” recruiter will really help you fill your vacancies quickly and cost-effectively.

 

Why hate head-hunters?

Ask anyone what a head-hunter does and they’ll probably say something like “aren’t they the ones who steal people?”

Ask  highly trained executives and they will say something like “aren’t they the pushy types that call you out of the blue trying to get you to leave your job for some other job they’re pushing-so they can make a killing?

Ask employers and they will say something like “they’re always trying to get us to hire someone that we don’t need or offering to help us fill a job that we don’t need any help in filling-just so that they can make a killing!

 

The things said about head-hunters above are from the small picture perspective, but if you look at the big picture-it’s a totally different story.

My point is they play a very important role in an industry, be it mining, power generation or any other technical job yet very rarely is the profession of head-hunter viewed in a positive light. This is because the role of a head-hunter is misunderstood.

The fact is head-hunters play a very important role in any industry.  They are the enforcers of competition and ensure competition is balanced among competing firms within that industry. In addition, headhunting is a business strategy that provides a fantastic return on investment. If, as a client, you employ those earning over £50K in sectors such as mining, power generation or any other senior appointment then engaging a head-hunter will provide a good return on your investment. If you are a senior executive with niche skills then, again you can only benefit by developing a relationship with a head-hunter whose daily tasks include approaching clients you would like to work for.

Balancing Competition

 

An example of balancing competition is recruiting some of the top talent away from the larger firms and placing that talent in a smaller firm that has been wise enough to devise a package that will attract them.  High performing talent will allow that small local firm to compete on a level-playing-field with the larger companies.  As a result the smaller firm will end up capturing more customers from the weaker firms.

Collapsing under its-own Weight

 

Without balanced competition the bigger firms will become even bigger; simply by acquiring the smaller firms and with more consolidation in an industry, there will be less competition.  With less competing firms, there will be fewer jobs.

The role of head-hunters is to prevent job losses by balancing competition in the industry they serve.

 

Return-on Investment

 

Employed as a strategy, headhunting will save employers a fortune in working capital and saving money is crucial, especially in a recession.  By working capital, I’m referring to salaries that are paid to employees while they are being trained. One view is that money spent on training of employees is like pouring money down the drain. In my opinion headhunting should form part of a company’s strategy for building the best team possible along with the careful selection of candidates to be trained who will stay with the company. If you think about it a recruiter/head-hunter can help you source reliable, trainable talent AND fully trained high-flyers.

 

Why should I utilise head-hunters and train some employees?

Because a lot of trainees won’t return to the employers the investment that they have made in their training.  At the end of the day a number of trainees will end up as just average performers, others will leave the industry and superstars will probably be recruited away to a competitor at some point.  Then the training process starts all over again with the same results.

 

Payroll v. Placement Fees

 

That is why a strategy for success is not to spend ££££££’s on training alone.  A good head-hunter will recruit talent away from your competitors after they are trained, remain loyal to the client that engaged them and produce the best talent.   It’s a smart decision on the part of an employer because good head-hunters place talent that returns immediate profits!  Profits to their clients, generated from the investments made by others, most likely their competitor. It may not be fair but it happens-daily!

 

Final Thoughts

 

Headhunting is a respected and commonly employed strategy for professional career advancement and a tool that produces a super ROI for employers.

Senior executives can only benefit by staying in touch with the head-hunters they know

Savvy clients employ head-hunters…

When is the recruiter going to call me back?

I know it is frustrating when you don’t get the call you have been waiting for but here is what may be going on…

Recruiters call back when they have something to tell you.  We have other projects, deadlines and other candidates waiting which means we will call back when we have time and something to tell you.  Recruiters get paid for getting you a job so they definitely do want to call you. Recruiters are filling a number of other positions and have other clients pressing them to find that elusive ideal candidate.  It is not uncommon for a recruiter to have 20+ open positions and the idea is to fill them all and then retire to the boat in the Mediterranean.

Most recruiters are at the mercy of the hiring manager who will also have meetings, deadlines, and projects.  I have often been asked if the candidate would be available for interview the day after the CV was submitted because of hiring manager availability, not only do you want to meet them, you also want to catch them when they ask for you.  Sometimes it seems like all of the stars and the moons need to line up for the miracle of a meeting to take place.  Don’t worry, it isn’t you but it is the process and in a larger company, there is a lot of process!

My advice:  Be patient and keep an eye on your recruiter’s social media, it is much easier for recruiters and head-hunters to post updates once rather than make hundreds of calls. Look out for email updates, you will know if you have been shortlisted and I can assure you recruiters chase their clients for answers. Finally, please do not think there is anything wrong with you, if you are getting calls from recruiters then that is a very good sign; it is just unfortunate the process can take such a long time.

Do you ever wonder why you never hear back after applying for a job?

Jobseekers often wonder why they never hear anything back after they hit ‘send’ on the email with a resume attached or on the on-line job application. If you’re very lucky, you might have a preliminary email exchange or telephone call with a recruiter but then never hear from them again.

It’s a depressing experience and probably one which, in your opinion, also casts a shadow on the recruiters’ reputation. So why does it happen? Is it you, is it them, or is it just something every candidate must prepare for in the hiring process?

Job seekers face an uphill struggle, especially in these tough economic times. High unemployment globally means more competition for every vacancy and that means the employers and their recruiters have “the pick of the bunch”

Recruiters complain that as many as 50 percent of people applying for a job they are working on simply aren’t qualified and even if you are the right candidate you have to get yourself to the “top of the pile”. So how do you break through?

Here are my top 5 reasons you’re not hearing back after applying for a job with five suggestions for ways to avoid your CV disappearing into the abyss:

 

You really aren’t qualified. If a job description specifies a Master Black Belt, Six Sigma qualified engineer with over 7 years of experience and you’re a recent graduate looking for your first proper job, it’s unlikely you’ll get a call! Avoid disappointment – don’t apply for jobs for which you are not qualified. Most job descriptions are written with very specific requirements and often list essential criteria. The recruitment consultant is trying to find the most qualified candidate and yes, they are trying to weed people out. It’s not personal but it is business and it is recruitment.

 

You haven’t keyword-optimized your resume or application. Job descriptions contain keywords specific to the skills or attributes the recruiter seeks in applicants. A close read of the job description is a necessity, as is keyword-optimizing your resume and cover letter, should you choose to use one. Use keywords at the bottom of your CV and ensure the summary at the top of your CV succinctly describes your talents. Examples of keywords could be: “gold mine” and “general manager” and diamonds and coal and copper. Recruiters use Boolean search to find you so use the right keywords.

 

Your CV isn’t formatted properly. There is a raft of free information available on the Internet on how to present your CV. Whatever you do don’t post a photocopy of your CV or use borders, shading, fancy graphics or animation-all of these make it impossible for some recruitment software programs to import your CV. Recruiters in general are not lazy but why make it hard for them? And finally, make sure you send your CV as a plain word document and not a pdf! Recruiters will remove your name and contact details before sending your CV to their clients and this is tough to do if you send a pdf.

 

Your resume is substantially different from your online profile. Sites such as LinkedIn and other social networking sites can be useful tools and it‘s important to make sure what you put on them matches what’s on your resume. So if you are looking for work as a technical sales engineer then make sure your online profiles back that up.

 

The company received 500 resumes for one job posting, and yours was #499. Every morning (early) scour the job postings and jump on anything for which you’re qualified and that interest you. Keep a list of all your applications and never apply for the same job more than once.

How to get noticed:

 

Research interesting companies on social media. Find out who the recruiters are and interact with them. Many will tweet new postings, post LinkedIn updates and advertise jobs on Facebook pages. You need to watch their streams and jump on jobs you are qualified for.

 

Consider starting a blog in your area of interest or expertise. Social media is big and used by recruiters extensively so you need to advertise your digital persona. Include your blog link and links to your digital presence in your emails to the recruiters you’re working with.

 

Consider getting professional help with your resume. If you really are uncomfortable producing your CV then there are people out there who can help. Either a resume writer or an SEO expert can help you increase your odds of getting through the talent management software or the recruiter’s critical eye. If you can’t afford this step then use Google to find free templates and advice online.

 

If at all possible, don’t wait until you’re out of work to find your next job. I realize for many people this isn’t possible or might even be offensive or unethical, but your chances of finding the next job are best when you’re still employed. I strongly recommend you create the best LinkedIn profile you can, this strikes me as a good way of getting yourself out there without making your current employer feel uncomfortable. Check online, there is a good chance your boss has posted a profile!

 

Network. You will hear this often with good reason. You need to be visible, be upbeat, and be informed about industry trends and news in your area of expertise. Use the social networks; Facebook is not just for family pics and talking about that fantastic party.

Finding a job can be a tough and emotional experience. I would say that only 10% of the CVs I read lead me to pick up the phone and conduct an interview.  Don’t take it personally and don’t give up – it’s not a rejection of you, it’s a reflection of the times. If you don’t hear back then double check what you have applied for and read these tips again.

 

How to get a great job…

 

 

Imagine the scene…you are online and you see a job that you really like the look of, then what? Do you send your CV? Do you attach a covering letter? Do you think about it for a while? Do nothing?

What goes on behind the scenes at recruitment agencies seems to be a hot topic on the blogs at the moment. All sorts of things are being quoted about the percentages of CVs rejected because of spelling errors, how many covering letters are read, what gets read in the first 30 seconds, should I summarize my skills at the top of my CV etc.

If you are serious about making a move in the job market then you need to know exactly where you are and what you want. You also need to understand the marketplace you are looking in and you need a good and trustworthy guide. There is no magic formula but there a lot of simple things that you can do to make things happen the way you want them to.

So here are some of my top tips for chasing the job you really want.

  1. Find an appropriate consultant.

 

Good recruitment consultants are worth their weight in gold and there are good ones out there that can really help you land that dream job. It is important you choose someone who you trust and can work with, someone who knows your sector.

A good consultant will not work with you unless your skills match the sector(s) they recruit for and they feel you are a strong candidate. I look for candidates who work in the technical, mining and senior appointment sectors so if you have no experience in these areas then it is unlikely we will work together. Recruiters want to understand you, your motivations, your ambitions and what problems you can solve for their clients. They will want to understand your career expectations so that they can help you plan your career moves correctly.

  1. Network

 

It’s not what you know, and it never has been. You need to build a strong and sensible network. You know a lot of people, but who do they know, and who can introduce you to whom? I use online social networks and so do most good recruiters but don’t forget good old-fashioned meeting people-you know-shaking hands and looking them in the eye. This method is not dead and do not think all your prayers will be answered by sitting in front of your computer all day long, firing out emails. You should pick up the phone and speak to people, if that leads to a meeting then great!

  1. Be realistic

 

The real reason CVs get rejected by recruiters is that the CV doesn’t fit the role. Examples might include the butcher applying for electrical project engineer or mine manager job. Seasoned recruiters go out of their way to comprehensively understand the needs of their clients and only they know all the details of their client’s job description. I am 100% certain you have more chance of getting the job when applying through a recruiter. If you have niche skills in sectors such as mining or power generation then it is unlikely the local Jobcentre plus will be useful.

Calling or emailing a consultant who has rejected your application is fine if you are ringing to understand what you need to do next time or what experience you should get to increase your marketability. Phoning to complain, or in an attempt to convince them that they are wrong is not, and it does nothing to improve your chances of success next time.

If you apply for everything that is remotely interesting to you, the truth is that you are wasting your time. Please only apply for roles that you have the skills, experience and desire to do. Recruiters can see if you are desperate and firing out your CV everywhere. Carefully consider what you want to do and only apply for jobs where you are certain you will solve the problems the client has.

There are lot of people who apply to dozens of jobs a day and often to everything that is posted by a particular consultant. What this does is clog up that consultant’s inbox. Do they read every application you make? No, of course they don’t. Have you heard the story of the boy who cried wolf? The principle here is the same.

  1. Write a great CV

 

You need to ensure everything seen on the Internet about you is favourable and writing a great CV is the first part of this. A CV is a marketing/sales document and nothing more. The better is it written, the better it sells your experience specific to each role you apply for. Incidentally I do not rate these companies who approach you offering to write “a dream job winning CV”. All the information you need to write a great resume is available on the web for FREE!

  1. Make it happen

 

No one is going to do it all for you. A good consultant will certainly help but they need to be recruiting for a client that is looking for your specific skill set. So; network, apply to adverts and online posts. Work hard at finding that great job and keep a record of your applications because it really looks bad if you apply for the same job twice or even more often! Choose the right recruiter; be organised, targeted, smart and determined.

Good luck!

 

Humour for a Friday

Please check and ensure none of the following appears on your CV;

 

ACHIEVEMENTS  – “I came first in the school long distance race”

HOBBIES – “Horse rideing,like going pub when havent got my kids.looking after kids and doing stuff with them when they anit at school.”

EMAIL ADDRESS – Lazysod@……

ACHIEVEMENTS – “Being sober”

ABOUT ME – “My favourite colour is Toupe, cos it rhymes with Dope”

REASON FOR LEAVING – “It was hard work”

PERSONAL PROFILE – “I be no stranger to double-entry. I loves numbers, and my wife and I loves journals and ledgers! Can also do tricky sums when I puts my mind to it. Computor litrate.”

COVERING LETTER – “This is my CV I am intrested in any job opening use have avaiable if u could please send a vercation that you reciceved the email”

PERSONAL PROFILE – “I do have convictions (drug offences) which are spent some 30 years ago for when I was 16-18 and have a caution for 4 years ago for criminal damage”

HOBBIES – “Marital Arts” (Possibly meant martial arts?)

KEY SKILLS – “Perfectionist with a keen I for details.”

HOBBIES – “Space Travel”

EMAIL ADDRESS – Batfacedgirl@………..

EMPLOYMENT HISTORY –  “Whilst working in this role, I had intercourse with a variety of people”

HOBBIES – “i like playing sport, which i fined gives me a winning appitite for life’”

KEY SKILLS: “I would like to assure you that I am a hardly working person.”

HOBBIES –  “enjoy cooking Chinese and Italians”

JOB HISTORY – “Career break in 1999 to renovate my horse”

SKILLS – “Fantastic ability in multi-tasting.”

SIZE OF EMPLOYER: “Very tall, probably over 6’5″.”

SKILLS – “Speak English and Spinach.”

STRENGTHS – “Ability to meet deadlines while maintaining composer.”

SKILLS – “I have technical skills that will simply take your breath away.”

MARITAL STATUS:- “Celibate”

SKILLS – From an IT Engineer, “Have you tried turning it off and on again?”

EMAIL ADDRESS – hotsexyluv@…….

KEYS SKILLS – keeping family home clean, tidy and hygienaic undertaking basic DIY.operating domestic taskslike cleaning,washing,cooking.dealing with emerengencies smoothly.dealing with health issues,superivsing,supporting,guiding and organising children.

CV GAP – Candidate explained his gap in employment by saying it was because he was getting over the death of his cat for 3 months!

KEY SKILLS – “But wait…there’s more. You get all this business knowledge plus a grasp of marketing that is second nature.”

PRINTED CV – Candidate sent over their CV printed on the back of their current employers headed company paper

SKILLS – “I can type without looking at thekeyboard.”

JOB HISTORY – “Left last four jobs only because the managers were completely unreasonable”

SKILLS – “I am a rabid typist”

HOBBIES – “My interests include cooking dogs and interesting people”

COVERING LETTER – “I am extremely loyal to my current employer….Feel free to ring my office if you are interested in my CV”

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS – “Received a plague for Salesperson of the Year.”

EDUCATION – “I am about to enrol on a Business and Finance Degree with the Open University. I feel that this qualification will prove detrimental to me for future success.”

HOBBIES: “donating blood – 12 litres so far.”

KEY SKILLS: “Assisted with filing, billing, printing and coping”

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS – “Oversight of entire department.”

EDUCATION –  “University: August 1890 to May 1993″

WORK EXPERIENCE –“ I’m working today in a furniture factory as a drawer”

EMAIL ADDRESS – homeboy@……

KEY SKILLS – “I have extensive experience with foreign accents.”

QUALIFICATIONS – “Here are my qualifications for you to overlook.”

COVER LETTER – “Please disregard the attached CV; it’s totally outdated”

REASON FOR LEAVING – “After receiving advice from several different angels, I have decided to pursue a new line of work.”

KEY SKILLS – “Am a perfectionist and rarely if if ever forget details.”

WORK EXPERIENCE – “Night stalker in Tesco”

HOBBIES – “painting my toenails in varying colours”

JOB HISTORY – “Promoted to area manger to oversee 37 storefronts.”

KEY SKILLS – “I am relatively intelligent, obedient and loyal as a puppy.”

COVER LETTER – “I have guts, drive, ambition and heart, which is probably more than a lot of the drones that you have working for you.”

EMAIL ADDRESS – dumbblonde@…….

AWARDS – “National record for eating 23 pancakes in 2 minutes”

WORK EXPERIENCE – “Child care provider, organised activities; prepared lunches and snakes”

KEY SKILLS – “Good people skills, except when people get on my nerves.  Which is hardly ever, no more often than once every ten minutes. ”

COVER LETTER – “I’m submitting the attached copy of my CV for your consumption.”

ACHIEVEMENTS – “Planned building of new building  at £2.5 million over budget.”

KEY SKILLS – “I am very used to working with thigh schedules.”

COVERING LETTER – “looking for a party-time position.”

KEY SKILLS – “I am quick at typing, about 30 word pers minute, 45 with strong coffee.”

WORK EXPERIENCE – “Dealing with customers’ conflicts that arouse.”

KEY SKILLS – “I am a tiger when needed, but otherwise a pussycat.”

NUMBER OF DEPENDENTS –  “40″

REASON FOR LEAVING – “I din’t give the company my full effort and received no chance of carer advancement in return.”

COVER LETTER –  “I host a superlative proficiency for resolving complex systematic problems. I have pedagogic expertise conducting sales, and I can be quickly utilized as an assiduous, visceral and proactive problem solver.”

REFERENCES – “Clare” (We might need a little more info)

KEY SKILLS – “Very experienced with out-house computers.”

WORK EXPERIENCE – “Responsibilities included recruiting, interviewing and executing final candidates.”

CURRENT SALARY – “£28,000. Salary desired: £170,000.”

KEY SKILLS – “I am a great team player I am”

PERSONAL PROFILE – “I’m a lean, mean, marketing machine”

REASON FOR LEAVING – “Company insisted that all employees get to work by 8:45 every morning. Couldn’t work under those conditions.”

HOBBIES – “Running, editing video, cooking, writing and wondering”

COVER LETTER – “I would be prepared to meet with you at your earliest convenience to discuss what I can do to your company.”

WORK EXPERIENCE – “Dispensed medication and passed out.”

JOB TITLE – “Ass. Manager.” (Possibly meant assistant manager?  At least I hope so.)

KEY SKILLS – “Being bilingual in 3 languages.”

COVER LETTER – “Dear Sir/Modem.”

KEY SKILLS – “My qulifications include close atention to detail.”

WORK EXPERIENCE – “Worked in a office where I carried out my own accountant.”

COVER LETTER – “Sorry for any incontinence.”

GAP IN CV – “Any interruption in employment is due to being unemployed.”

DESIRED POSITION – “Profreader.”

KEY SKILLS – “Grate communication skills.”

COVER LETTER – “Please don’t misconstrue my 14 jobs as ‘job-hopping’. I have never quit a job.”

KEY SKILLS – “I supervise employees with the iron fist!”

COVER SKILLS –  “Thank you for your consideration. Hope to hear from you shorty!”

WORK EXPERIENCE – “Please note from my CV I have 6 years buying, negotiating and sock-control experience”

COVER LETTER -”I’m submitting my CV to spite my lack of C++ and HTML experience”

KEY SKILLS – “Excellent memory; strong math aptitude; excellent memory.”

HOBBIES – “Relaxing with family and friends watching action movies”

PERSONAL PROFILE – “I wasn’t born – my mother simply chose ‘eject child’ from the special menu.”

REASON FOR LEAVING – “Responsibility makes me nervous”

WORK EXPERIENCE – “Whilst working in the hairdressers I had to deal with a lot of old biddies”

SKILLS – “I have a lot of integrity so I promise not to steal office supplies and take them home.”

EDUCATION – “Have repeated courses repeatedly.”

COVER LETTER – Why should you employ me?  I bring doughnuts on Friday.”

WORK EXPERIENCE – ““Filing, billing, printing and coping.”

 

 

 

How clients find the right recruiter…

A good recruiter/head-hunter can be an invaluable asset to any HR Manager or Hiring Manager. If you have not yet experienced success with a recruiter then perhaps you dealing with their approaches in the wrong way?

Here are 5 tips for a successful business relationship with a recruitment consultant:

  1. Choosing the right recruiter. Don’t just settle for the first one that calls you and promises the world instead, choose a niche recruiter. You need to feel comfortable with his or her approach and not feel at all pressured, pick a consultant who specialises in your sector and check out their profile on the social networks. Most good recruiters will check you out before deciding to call so they already feel you would be a suitable client for them! There are niche recruiters available for every sector e.g. mining, careers in power, technical and senior appointments etc. Use one who is connected with your industry and can recruit for the country where you need staff. You could be an Australian mining company with operations in Asia and Africa or an American owned company needing German speaking staff. You need an international recruiter with an appropriate database, language skills, track record and network of candidates.

  2. Be honest and comprehensive with your answers when asked questions.
    It should go without saying that the most important part of a recruiter client relationship is open and frank communication. If you have specific requirements, tell them straight away and if you have concerns about how they are proposing to recruit for you then say so. For example, you may know that in certain countries where you hire, particular nationalities work well together and others do not so tell your recruiter exactly who you want. Tell them your interview procedure; visa process, normal timescales, rotation, shift pattern, salary range, required skill-sets etc. An experienced recruiter relishes a challenge and prefers to be prepared prior to negotiations with candidates rather than being given new information at offer stage. Whatever you do, do not withhold information and if you do not know the answer then get it as soon as you can!

  3. Request and reward.
    Offer your recruiter exclusivity and do not try and negotiate the fee to rock bottom as it will have a negative effect. Recruiters are human, have bills to pay and choose their clients carefully. If you want a mediocre service then refusing to pay more than 50% of the recruiter’s suggested fee may get you exactly that or a straight refusal. Often recruiters will ask how many others are engaged, good consultants will not be interested in working with clients who use multiple recruiters because the only thing they are doing is complicating matters. You will be able to get the attention of a seasoned, effective recruiter by responding promptly to their calls, emails and requests for feedback. Loyalty ensues and you will be able to cultivate a bond with a recruiter who knows you are counting on them to fill that important vacancy!

  4. Listen and inform.
    Engaging the help of a recruiter will help you fill existing vacancies and those that come up in the future. Once a recruiter learns about your particular needs they will always be on the lookout for candidates you may want to hire. They read hundreds of CVs, register candidates daily, expand their candidate pool through social networks, offer referral fees to senior candidates and work hard attracting passive job seekers. Respond to your recruiter’s enquiries well then the CV’s will arrive in your inbox and the quality of the candidates will be excellent.

Investing the time talking to a “compatible” recruiter will really help you fill your vacancies quickly and cost-effectively.

 

Why hate head-hunters?

Ask anyone what a head-hunter does and they’ll probably say something like “aren’t they the ones who steal people?”

Ask  highly trained executives and they will say something like “aren’t they the pushy types that call you out of the blue trying to get you to leave your job for some other job they’re pushing-so they can make a killing?

Ask employers and they will say something like “they’re always trying to get us to hire someone that we don’t need or offering to help us fill a job that we don’t need any help in filling-just so that they can make a killing!

 

The things said about head-hunters above are from the small picture perspective, but if you look at the big picture-it’s a totally different story.

My point is they play a very important role in an industry, be it mining, power generation or any other technical job yet very rarely is the profession of head-hunter viewed in a positive light. This is because the role of a head-hunter is misunderstood.

The fact is head-hunters play a very important role in any industry.  They are the enforcers of competition and ensure competition is balanced among competing firms within that industry. In addition, headhunting is a business strategy that provides a fantastic return on investment. If, as a client, you employ those earning over £50K in sectors such as mining, power generation or any other senior appointment then engaging a head-hunter will provide a good return on your investment. If you are a senior executive with niche skills then, again you can only benefit by developing a relationship with a head-hunter whose daily tasks include approaching clients you would like to work for.

Balancing Competition

 

An example of balancing competition is recruiting some of the top talent away from the larger firms and placing that talent in a smaller firm that has been wise enough to devise a package that will attract them.  High performing talent will allow that small local firm to compete on a level-playing-field with the larger companies.  As a result the smaller firm will end up capturing more customers from the weaker firms.

Collapsing under its-own Weight

 

Without balanced competition the bigger firms will become even bigger; simply by acquiring the smaller firms and with more consolidation in an industry, there will be less competition.  With less competing firms, there will be fewer jobs.

The role of head-hunters is to prevent job losses by balancing competition in the industry they serve.

 

Return-on Investment

 

Employed as a strategy, headhunting will save employers a fortune in working capital and saving money is crucial, especially in a recession.  By working capital, I’m referring to salaries that are paid to employees while they are being trained. One view is that money spent on training of employees is like pouring money down the drain. In my opinion headhunting should form part of a company’s strategy for building the best team possible along with the careful selection of candidates to be trained who will stay with the company. If you think about it a recruiter/head-hunter can help you source reliable, trainable talent AND fully trained high-flyers.

 

Why should I utilise head-hunters and train some employees?

Because a lot of trainees won’t return to the employers the investment that they have made in their training.  At the end of the day a number of trainees will end up as just average performers, others will leave the industry and superstars will probably be recruited away to a competitor at some point.  Then the training process starts all over again with the same results.

 

Payroll v. Placement Fees

 

That is why a strategy for success is not to spend ££££££’s on training alone.  A good head-hunter will recruit talent away from your competitors after they are trained, remain loyal to the client that engaged them and produce the best talent.   It’s a smart decision on the part of an employer because good head-hunters place talent that returns immediate profits!  Profits to their clients, generated from the investments made by others, most likely their competitor. It may not be fair but it happens-daily!

 

Final Thoughts

 

Headhunting is a respected and commonly employed strategy for professional career advancement and a tool that produces a super ROI for employers.

Senior executives can only benefit by staying in touch with the head-hunters they know

Savvy clients employ head-hunters…

Why is it recruiters don’t call me back?

Successful recruiters do not waste time with anyone who is not a fit for their clients or does not respond to reasonable requests. You were called (or emailed) initially for a very specific reason, either:

  1. You have the skills or experience required for the job being working on.
  2. You work for a client competitor and the idea is to try and tempt you out of your current job in to a new one.
  3. Your name was given as a reference or you were recommended.
  4. Your LinkedIn profile suggests you may be a good match.

When I call you I will want to ask some basic questions first of all to ensure you really are a match. After that I will ask about your strengths and weaknesses in the workplace and encourage you to tell me about how you got to where you are today. Finally I will ask specific questions about your ability to do the job I am recruiting for.

Sometimes candidates ask questions that make it seem they may not be a good fit before we really get going and here are some examples:

  1. You receive a call about a position and you immediately ask, “Who is the client?”because you’re too busy to speak.

 

What you should do: Set a better time to speak with me later that day or later in the week. Make it clear whether you are open or not to making a change and look forward to the next conversation if there should be one. If you have zero interest in making a career change then tell me this now, but let me know what type of opportunities you may be interested in down the road and a time frame to follow up in. For example, “Thank you for thinking of me, but at this time I have lots of irons in the fire and don’t really need your help. However if you do come across an opening in Mining Senior Management or Power Generation, I’d be willing to listen, but not until…”

 

  1. You receive a job description along with a few general questions about your expectations, you reply curtly with…………..“What’s the salary?” You’ve just told me that money is your only motivator and you only will give me your time if you know what the compensation package is first. 90% of the time I will not reply back with the number because I don’t know it or you have sufficiently put me off.

 

What you should do: If money is the biggest factor in making career decisions, you’ve probably moved around a lot or haven’t had much tenure in one place. It’s OK to be money motivated, most of us are, but remember a recruiter needs to know certain things first before talking about compensation. Most clients give us recruiters a fair range of base salary, commission structure, sign-on bonus, equity, etc. There is no way to determine what the actual package will be if the recruiter doesn’t get the information he needs. If you are the ideal type of candidate the client is looking for, this usually means you are paid higher than an average person in a similar role. Surely discussing your current salary and on-target earnings (with me) can only help you obtain the salary you would need to make a change?  It is important you build a mutual trust and respect with a recruiter and this comes through good communication. Pick up the phone and call instead of sending one-line emails, you should know that you’re not the only person being contacted. Call back when you say you’re going to call back. Send your resume when you say you’re going to send it…

 

Please think twice about how you respond to a call from a recruiter-it might be the call that changes your life!

Not hiring right now? That shouldn’t mean you stop looking.

Have you ever found yourself buying something just because it’s on sale? You see that 75% off price tag and, even though you might not need an industrial strength pressure washer, you imagine all the useful things you could do with it if you bought it. We’ve all been there and, surprisingly, the talent market in your industry is remarkably similar. The only difference is that the good deal you snap up from me is likely to do more than collect dust in your garage.

My point is that just because you don’t have an immediate need for people, it doesn’t mean you should stop looking.  I have always thought that no matter how good I was at something, there would always be someone better who I could learn from or someone whose skills I could use to bolster my team. You might not have a position waiting to be filled right now, but what if you could replace the weakest link in your team with a superstar?

The fact is that “good deals” are hitting the talent market constantly.  I’m approached by candidates constantly, at night, at the weekends and whilst I’m on holiday-it’s my job and I am OK with that so why not take advantage of my network? They are the top performers at companies that didn’t make it, brilliant recent graduates, seasoned veterans looking for a change or contractors who have recently finished an assignment, and they’re the people that could help you. They might be on the market next time you need to expand, but in my experience you will find another company quickly snaps them up.

You could wait until you have a pressing need for a mining engineer, consultant, director, CEO or drill mechanic and then engage me. The other way is to accept my offer of a once weekly roundup of available candidates who might just be that replacement for your under-performing employee or perfect for your future requirements. Staying in touch with me is a great way of keeping abreast of the talent available now or soon to be.

Before I call or email you I will have read through your Website and made an educated guess about the types of candidate you would like to see. What have you got to lose by telling me a little more about the candidate types that would benefit your organisation? It doesn’t cost you anything and you don’t have to interview any of the candidates I send you, but I might find somebody you didn’t know you were looking for!

 

Why clients should use recruiters…

Some people think recruiters are people who just make a lot of calls, send a lot of emails, and scan the job boards hoping to find a job to fill, or someone in need of a job. I am sure there are recruiters like that, but they will produce very mediocre results at best and I am certainly not like that.

 

I think one of the most important skills I have is the ability to open the mind of star candidates who weren’t even considering making a move until I got them on the phone to talk about your opportunity. The reason this is so important is that qualified and potentially interested job candidates fall into one of three categories:

 

Active – These people are engaged in an active job search and have posted their CVs on the job boards hoping to be contacted by me. They make up about 10% of the qualified talent pool. Often they are “job hoppers” and not necessarily the right type for you so I will filter them saving you a lot of time and effort.

 

Semi-Active – These people are currently employed but have decided to find a new opportunity. However, because of the sensitivity of the situation, they must conduct their job search in a covert fashion, relying on networking, referrals and personal contacts for their job leads. This job candidate grouping represents approximately 15% to 20% of the qualified talent pool and my network helps my clients tap in to this category.

 

Non-Active/passive: These types are not seeking a change but maybe tempted by the right opportunity! They are currently employed and totally unaware that a better opportunity may exist for them with another employer. Since they are non-active, the primary way to reach this group of approximately 70% of the qualified talent pool is through the confidential approach of a recruiter who knows how to engage these candidates.

 

With only 30% of the qualified talent pool in an active or semi-active job changing mode, employers who do not utilise my services maybe shutting themselves out from approximately 70% of the qualified talent pool.

 

So how much do I charge clients?

 

Here is a straight answer: 20-27.5% of the first annual salary.

 

The fee I charge depends on the type of candidate(s) you need, the vacancy they will be filling and what you would like me to do. In short, if the job is more manual or you need high numbers of the same type of candidate then my fee will be at the lower end of the scale and will be agreed through negotiation. You may want me to collate copies of documents you will require from the candidate for visa applications, travel or medicals and this will slightly increase my charge. If you only want me to ask the candidate basic questions and then send you the CV with a summary of their answers then that will be reflected in my fee.

 

If you want me to recruit high “pay band” managers/executives with niche skills, who are likely to make a significant impact on your bottom line then, my fee will be at the higher end. These people are looking for positions where they will be earning six figure salaries plus bonuses, car, health etc and are much more difficult to recruit-often in the “passive” category. I will go in to much more depth when interviewing this type of candidate and you will be given much more detail with the commentary that will be sent with the resume.

 

 

Are bigger agencies better?

 

I work alone and engage other trusted recruiters when required so I don’t think so. I turned down employment opportunities with much larger organisations, one of them in the top 3 largest in the world. I did this because I wanted to do things my way; completely unrestricted by geographical area or sector-it means I can offer a bespoke service to the clients I work with.

 

One would think it makes sense that a bigger recruiting firm will be able to produce more job candidates faster for their client companies because they have a lot more resources to put into a search. It makes sense, but is not necessarily true…

 

The bigger firms DO have more recruiters, researchers, etc, but they also represent more companies and cannot (ethically) recruit from their client companies to fill your job. This ends up limiting the sources of candidates for you to consider for your job. They will have some very experienced recruiters and a lot more junior recruiters. If your company does a lot of business with these larger firms then you may get the more experienced recruiter working on your search.  However, you will probably often get more of a “Recruiter in training” looking for matching candidates. It is common practice for a senior recruiter to have a junior searching for the candidate to then read through the CVs that are found-in my experience it is better for me to look in the first place, especially for the more senior “white collar” candidates as I am the one who carefully questioned you to find out exactly what it is you need.

 

As a specialized recruiter I usually represent fewer companies and try to excel in providing a high level of service to my clients. Fewer client companies mean a larger pool of companies from which to recruit for your job openings. Your jobs are my living, that is very important to me and so is my relationship with you.

 

How can we best work together?

 

I would suggest the main thing to remember when working with me is to treat me like a partner in solving your problem.  Please communicate openly about the level of service you need and be willing to pay a fair price for it. Allowing me access to the hiring manager for the position is highly recommended since they’re the ones that are feeling the pain and know the details of the position.  I have a Fortune 500 Company that gives me a 30 minute time slot with the relevant hiring manager each time they give me a new vacancy to work on. As a result my interview to hire ratio is excellent and the client is happy-this is what I want for you. I can be a great resource for you and it’s something I enjoy doing.

 

 

 

 

 

How should I layout my CV to get that interview?

You may never know why you didn’t get chosen for a job interview but a recent study is shedding some light on recruiters’ decision-making behaviour.

According to recent research, recruiters spend an average of “six seconds before they make the initial ‘fit or no fit’ decision” on candidates and I am sorry to say, in my case, it is occasionally much quicker than that.

The study used a scientific technique called “eye tracking” on 30 professional recruiters and examined their eye movements during a 10-week period to “record and analyze where and how long someone focuses when digesting a piece of information or completing a task.”

So what gets looked at first…?

In the short time that they spend with your resume, the study showed recruiters will look at your name, current title and company, current position start and end dates, previous title and company, previous position start and end dates, and education. Personally, if I was reading your CV I would like to see a summary of your skills right at the top and my method of reading a CV matches the results of the study.

With such critical time constraints, please make it easier for me to find pertinent information. Create a resume with a clear visual hierarchy and don’t include distracting visuals since “such visual elements reduced recruiters’ analytical capability and hampered decision-making” and kept them from “locating the most relevant information, like skills and experience.”  As I have mentioned before, don’t use any fancy formatting such as borders, bullet points or shading, it really does not help!

Please also bear in mind I use Boolean search strings to find you so it is important to ensure your key skills are listed on your CV. It really is quite easy to make your CV more likely to be selected and that is what we both want!

The 25 most difficult questions you’ll be asked on a job interview

I am sent a lot of tips and the following has been adapted from an article received via “recruiting blogs”

I may choose to ask you any of the following questions and they are classics. In addition I fully intend to get you an interview and you should not be surprise if my client also asks at least some of the same questions!

Being prepared is half the battle…

  1. Tell me about yourself.

Since this is often the opening question in an interview, be extra careful that you don’t go on forever. Keep your answer to a minute or two at most. Cover four topics: early years, education, work history and recent career experience. Emphasise this last subject. Remember that this is likely normally a warm-up question. Don’t waste your best points on it!

  1. What do you know about our organisation?

Your preparation should enable you to discuss products or services, revenues, reputation, image, goals, problems, management style, people, history and philosophy. But don’t act as if you know everything about the place. Let your answer show that you have taken the time to do some research, but don’t overwhelm the interviewer, and make it clear that you wish to learn more.

You might start your answer in this manner: “In my job search, I’ve investigated a number of companies and yours is one of the few that interests me, for these reasons…”

Give your answer a positive tone. Don’t say, “Well, everyone tells me that you’re in all sorts of trouble, and that’s why I’m here”, even if that is why you’re there.

  1. Why do you want to work for us?

Here, and throughout the interview, a good answer comes from having done your homework so that you can speak in terms of the company’s needs. You might say that your research has shown that the company is doing things you would like to be involved with, and that it’s doing them in ways that greatly interest you. For example, if the organisation is known for strong management, your answer should mention that fact and show that you would like to be a part of that team. If the company places a great deal of emphasis on research and development  then emphasise the fact that you want to create new things and that you know this is a place where such activity is encouraged. If the organisation stresses financial controls, your answer should mention a reverence for numbers.

If you feel that you have to concoct an answer to this question – if, for example, the company stresses research, and you feel that you should mention it even though it really doesn’t interest you- then you probably should not be attending that interview, because you probably shouldn’t be considering a job with that organisation.

Your homework should include learning enough about the company to avoid approaching places where you wouldn’t be able -or wouldn’t want- to function. Since most of us are poor liars, it’s difficult to con anyone in an interview. But even if you should succeed at it, your prize is a job you don’t really want.

  1. What can you do for us that someone else can’t?

Here you have every right, and perhaps an obligation to “blow your own trumpet” and be slightly egotistical. Talk about your record of getting things done and mention specifics from your CV or list of career accomplishments. Say that your skills and interests, combined with this history of getting results, make you valuable. Mention your ability to set priorities, identify problems, and use your experience and energy to solve them.

  1. What do you find most attractive about this position? What seems least attractive about it?

List three or four attractive factors of the job, and mention a single, minor, unattractive item.

  1. Why should we hire you?

Create your answer by thinking in terms of your ability, your experience, and your energy.

  1. What do you look for in a job?

Keep your answer oriented to opportunities at this organisation. Talk about your desire to perform and be recognised for your contributions. Make your answer oriented toward opportunity rather than personal security.

  1. Please give me your definition of [the position for which you are being interviewed].

Keep your answer brief and task oriented. Think in terms of responsibilities and accountability. Make sure that you really do understand what the position involves before you attempt an answer. If you are not certain then ask.  The interviewer may answer the question for you.

  1. How long would it take you to make a meaningful contribution to our firm?

Be realistic. Say that, while you would expect to meet pressing demands and pull your own weight from the first day, it might take six months to a year before you could expect to know the organisation and its needs well enough to make a major contribution.

  1. How long would you stay with us?

Say that you are interested in a career with the organisation, but admit that you would have to continue to feel challenged to remain with any organisation. Think in terms of, “As long as we both feel achievement-oriented.”

  1. Your resume suggests that you may be over-qualified or too experienced for this position. What’s your opinion?

Emphasise your interest in establishing a long-term association with the organisation, and say that you assume that if you perform well in this job, new opportunities will open up for you. Mention that a strong company needs a strong staff. Observe that experienced executives are always at a premium. Suggest that since you are so well-qualified, the employer will get a fast return on his investment. Say that a growing, energetic company can never have too much talent.

  1. What is your management style?

You should know enough about the company’s style to know that your management style will complement it. Possible styles include: task oriented (I’ll enjoy problem-solving identifying what’s wrong, choosing a solution and implementing it”), results-oriented (“Every management decision I make is determined by how it will affect the bottom line”), or even paternalistic (“I’m committed to taking care of my subordinates and pointing them in the right direction”).

A participative style is currently quite popular: an open-door method of managing in which you get things done by motivating people and delegating responsibility.

As you consider this question, think about whether your style will let you work happily and effectively within the organisation.

  1. Are you a good manager? Can you give me some examples? Do you feel that you have top managerial potential?

Keep your answer achievement and ask-oriented. Rely on examples from your career to support your argument. Stress your experience and your energy.

  1. What do you look for when you hire people?

Think in terms of skills initiative and the adaptability to be able to work comfortably and effectively with others. Mention that you like to hire people who appear capable of moving up in the organisation.

  1. Have you ever had to fire people? What were the reasons, and how did you handle the situation?

Admit that the situation was not easy, but say that it worked out well, both for the company and, you think, for the individual. Show that, like anyone else, you don’t enjoy unpleasant tasks but that you can resolve them efficiently and -in the case of firing someone- humanely.

  1. What do you think is the most difficult thing about being a manager or executive?

Mention planning, execution, and cost-control. The most difficult task is to motivate and manage employees to get something planned and completed on time and within the budget.

  1. What important trends do you see in our industry?

Be prepared with two or three trends that illustrate how well you understand your industry. You might consider technological challenges or opportunities, economic conditions, or even regulatory demands as you collect your thoughts about the direction in which your business is heading.

  1. Why are you leaving (did you leave) your present (last) job?

Be brief, to the point, and as honest as you can without hurting yourself. Refer back to the planning phase of your job search where you considered this topic as you set your reference statements. If you were laid off in an across-the-board layoff of personnel then say so; otherwise, indicate that the move was your decision, the result of your action. Do not mention personality conflicts.

The interviewer may spend some time probing you on this issue, particularly if it is clear that you were terminated. The “We agreed to disagree” approach may be useful. Remember that your references are likely to be checked, so don’t concoct a story for an interview.

  1. How do you feel about leaving all your benefits to find a new job?

Mention that you are concerned, naturally, but not panicked. You are willing to accept some risk to find the right job for yourself. Don’t suggest that security might interest you more than getting the job done successfully.

  1. In your current or last position, what features do you or did you like the most and the least?

Be careful and be positive. Describe more features that you liked than disliked. Don’t cite personality problems. If you make your last job sound terrible, an interviewer may wonder why you remained there until now.

  1. What do you think of your boss?

Be as positive as you can. A potential boss is likely to wonder if you might talk about him in similar terms at some point in the future. Don’t “vent your spleen” because you were wronged by your former boss.

  1. Why aren’t you earning more at your age?

Say that this is one reason that you are conducting this job search. Don’t be defensive. If interviewing for a sales position then state your confidence in selling and ask for a high commission payment to offset the basic, if you think it is a little low.

  1. What do you feel this position should pay?

Salary is a delicate topic. I suggest that you defer tying yourself to a precise figure for as long as you can do so politely. You might say, “I understand that the range for this job is between £______ and £______. That seems appropriate for the job as I understand it.” You might answer the question with a question: “Perhaps you can help me on this one. Can you tell me if there is a range for similar jobs in the organisation?” Ask about the whole package, they may offer bonuses, accommodation allowance, travelling expenses etc.

If you are asked the question during an initial screening interview, you might say that you feel you need to know more about the position’s responsibilities before you could give a meaningful answer to that question. Here, too, either by asking the interviewer or recruiter, or in research done as part of your homework, you can try to find out whether there is a salary grade attached to the job. If there is, and if you can live with it, say that the range seems right to you.

If the interviewer continues to probe, you might say, “You know that I’m making £______ now and like most people, I’d wish to improve on that figure, but my major interest is with the job itself.” Remember that the act of taking a new job does not, in and of itself, make you worth more money.

If I am acting on your behalf then I will be able to help with the salary question. I will have a very good idea about the salary my client will be willing to pay and what other benefits will be on offer. I might suggest to you that working for a top ten listed Fortune 500 company may offer far better long term prospects and accepting a slightly lower salary than your were hoping for may be a good choice. Please consider all your options and do not turn down a job on salary alone.

If no price range is attached to the job, and the interviewer continues to press the subject, then you will have to respond with a number. I would always ask what you were earning with your last employer and please remember it is not too difficult for me to check! You cannot leave the impression that it does not really matter, that you’ll accept whatever is offered. If you’ve been making £80,000 a year, you can’t say that a £35,000 figure would be fine without sounding as if you’ve given up on yourself. (If you are making a radical career change, however, this kind of disparity may be more reasonable and understandable but it still sounds a little odd.)

Don’t sell yourself short, but continue to stress the fact that the job itself is the most important thing in your mind. The interviewer may be trying to determine just how much you want the job. Don’t leave the impression that money is the only thing that is important to you. Link questions of salary to the work itself and what you can offer.

  1. What are your long term goals?

Refer back to the planning phase of your job search. Don’t answer, “I want the job you’ve advertised.” Relate your goals to the company you are interviewing: ‘in a firm like yours, I would like to…”

  1. How successful have you been so far?

Say that, all-in-all; you’re happy with the way your career has progressed so far. Given the normal ups and downs of life, you feel that you’ve done quite well and have no complaints. Add that you have a lot to offer and reiterate past successes and how your innovative ideas and ways of doing things have and will make a difference.

Present a positive and confident picture of yourself, but don’t overstate your case. An answer like, “Everything’s wonderful! I can’t think of a time when things were going better! I’m overjoyed!” is likely to make an interviewer wonder whether you’re trying to fool him . . . or yourself. The most convincing confidence is usually quiet confidence.

Good luck with your job hunt and remember- the client pays me to help you.

 

How should I layout my CV to get that interview?

You may never know why you didn’t get chosen for a job interview but a recent study is shedding some light on recruiters’ decision-making behaviour.

According to recent research, recruiters spend an average of “six seconds before they make the initial ‘fit or no fit’ decision” on candidates and I am sorry to say, in my case, it is occasionally much quicker than that.

The study used a scientific technique called “eye tracking” on 30 professional recruiters and examined their eye movements during a 10-week period to “record and analyze where and how long someone focuses when digesting a piece of information or completing a task.”

So what gets looked at first…?

In the short time that they spend with your resume, the study showed recruiters will look at your name, current title and company, current position start and end dates, previous title and company, previous position start and end dates, and education. Personally, if I was reading your CV I would like to see a summary of your skills right at the top and my method of reading a CV matches the results of the study.

With such critical time constraints, please make it easier for me to find pertinent information. Create a resume with a clear visual hierarchy and don’t include distracting visuals since “such visual elements reduced recruiters’ analytical capability and hampered decision-making” and kept them from “locating the most relevant information, like skills and experience.”  As I have mentioned before, don’t use any fancy formatting such as borders, bullet points or shading, it really does not help!

Please also bear in mind I use Boolean search strings to find you so it is important to ensure your key skills are listed on your CV. It really is quite easy to make your CV more likely to be selected and that is what we both want!

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